Hog Wild

On A Cook Abroad (a BBC production) I saw a horrific scene of dogs going after a wild boar (cingiale in Italian). They’re nasty critters, I know as they take down calves at my in-laws’ ranch in Texas.

On the show featuring Monica Galetti the dogs were feasting on the boar’s flesh when one hunter slit the boar’s throat. I know that le Francais think you’re so superior to Americans. Let me tell you how we do it better. And this is Texas, where you think folks are all backwards. We’ve got an edge on France.

Why would a top end London chef want gnawed meat ravaged by dogs? To her credit, Chef Galetti showed shock and remorse.

Trap the wild hogs humanely in a large enclosure with food. Bring a truck and trailer and fashion your wire “hallway” to get from large trap to hallway to cage. My father-in-law and his friend never touched the hogs. Drive to a place in a nearby town, put them through a weigh station (I never got near the crazy beasts) and I charted the weight, stay out of the way and get out pen and paper, that was my job. Get paid by the pound. Two hogs are not nearly enough to pay the mortgage but money is money and neighbors get together to make tasty large enclosures not to make money, but to save their crops and cattle.

Hogs are transported to Ft. Worth Texas for slaughter and the meat placed on planes to FRANCE. Texans do not want to eat them, yet.

None of them have been roughed up by humans or dogs. As long as France and England want wild boar on the menu, Texas will continue to provide it. No gnawing dogs. Cheers, Dee

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One response to “Hog Wild

  1. Perhaps a Texas hero like Chef Tim Love is changing that Lone State penchant for not eating tasty varmints. If he called it cinghiale, Italian, diners would eat it. Same with guanciale, pork cheek.

    I would ask Chef Love what has sissified our Lone Star State over the years. A member for six years my husband was born and lived on a TX dairy that became a cattle ranch. Bulls’ eye has new meaning for me 14 years ago when I turned on the light to use the restroom. Something was disturbing outside as I had nine pair of bull staring at me thinking it was time for breakfast. I turned out the light.

    Talk about red bull, we’d pulled in from DFW before midnight so I didn’t get to see anything but the house and my room. The bulls were 20′ from me across the driveway. Staring. In the morning they were fed, and I have taken so many photos of the hay barn in different light over the years, it’s ridiculous. D

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